Make your mental health a priority, if not, this will come back to you at some point and then it will have the possibility that it collapses everything.

If you decide on going back to school while working, make it so that you work towards something that will, after you graduate, instantly makes it possible for you to improve the rest of your life (better work, more money, better work / life balance etc). If that is not the case and you are merely interested in a degree / knowledge / something else, prioritize work and mental health before taking on extra pressure.

@regalia@slrpnk.net
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Are you in dire need of money? It’s easy to become overwhelmed when having to divide your efforts into multiple things. The natural thing to do is to give each of them the right amount of priority. So how would you rank your work, school and mental health on a scale of priority? And may I ask you what’s your job and what class you’re in?

@regalia@slrpnk.net
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I did full time school and work for the first 2 years of college. I don’t recommend doing it, I had no free time. Taking classes with friends as a way to catch up with them while studying, before/after class, etc. helped a lot and being social online to allow more flexibility of when I was social were crucial to not completely falling apart.

I did study for my masters degree on weekends and worked on week days. You need to take precautions not to get burned out since it would ruing previous efforts like failing at exams or getting poor performance at work.

For example, I made it clear to any professor that I refuse to make any homework, except preparing the thesis of course. This is a very bold move, since professors not used to teach full time employees would see this as defiance. Those used to us don’t even bother with homework and dedicate some to make exercises or practice during study hours.

We also had to remind the staff that we need to take some weekends of every once in a while when they forget to t avoid exhaustion.

Things to consider with a schedule like this:

  • You wake up early every single day of month and year.
  • Traveling becomes difficult if not impossible.
  • You cannot schedule chores on week-ends. You need to spread them throughout the week instead.
  • At least for me, life got managed like a corporate activity, with calendars and schedules, etc. Want to meet with a friend, no problem, just check the agenda for an opening. You want Saturday? no I can’t, I meet SO on Saturdays. Sunday 18:00?, no can’t either, I have a bath then barber appointment. I’ll be done by 21:00. We can have dinner if you want at 21:30.
Kohen Shaw
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I was fortunate to have a flexible job in administration. I was doing about 32 hours a week ( 4 days a week ), then part time college, 6pm - 10pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays, then 9am - 6pm on Saturdays, started when I was 30, graduated this year. I was able to keep this going for the whole 4 years in college and graduated with decent grades too. It was still exhausting, no free time since my free time was being spent working on college assignments. Not sure how folks who do both full time work and college manage.

It helps a lot to have a somewhat flexible job, and a supportive partner.

Having to work while being in school is not ideal, but also not uncommon. Lots of people (me included) have done it successfully, so it’s absolutely possible with the right strategy.

If you already have problems with your mental health, this should be a priority. Make absolutely sure you are fit for uni, before starting! Otherwise the additional stress of the course load can have a big toll on your overall health and make you drop out. Seek counseling before attending.

The problem with multitasking (for a computer as well as for a human) is context switching. Constantly having to change between tasks (e.g. studying/work) costs a lot of mental resources, because you basically always have to focus anew on the current situation. So try to work and save the money during the lecture breaks and vacations, to focus solely on studying during the semesters.

Depending on your program, you might choose which classes to take for your degree. Find out exactly what classes are available and how they will be graded. In my experience classes that have final exams in the end of the semester are harder compared to those requiring the submission of a paper/essay or (group) projects. Exams always stressed the hell out of me, because no matter how good you were during the semester, the last few weeks always boil down to cramming books for different courses while the task of writing papers or doing projects can be distributed over a longer timespan. Choose the classes by the easiest grading methods, not so much by their topics.

m-p{3}
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I went to Uni and worked as a reservist in the Canadian Armed Forces during week-ends and summers. The pay was good enough, they kept me fed, kept me in shape but it required a good discipline to make sure to meet my obligations with both.

I managed to get my degree with almost no student debt.

non-diegetic screams
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